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Letters to the editor: So proud of our community; Busting the unions

So proud of our community

TO THE EDITOR

Once again I am so proud of our community!

Today I toured the new St. Croix Valley Business Innovation Center out at Sterling Ponds. What a gem. The building has a variety of spaces for rent on a monthly (not annual) basis for new businesses and lovely training and meeting rooms for rent by the hour. Plus free mentoring and support services. Costs don't get any lower than this for those who want to see their dream become a reality. And they provide free coffee.

I would like to wholeheartedly thank those who have made this possible. It will be a huge asset to our community, giving individuals and small business owners the startup help they need.

I'm sure Dale Jorgenson, who gave me my tour, won't mind me sharing his contact information. 612-597-0086.

Carole Mottaz

River Falls

Not normal, not acceptable

TO THE EDITOR

This is not normal. This is unacceptable. It is important to repeat these phrases and then ask, really?

Here is why. A Trump supporter I work with justified his vote for Trump by saying, we needed someone to tip over tables and help us reset. Really? How many tables need to be tipped over at once? Was it necessary to eviscerate our international leadership, attack immigrants and erode our institutions? Do we now accept lying as a reset? Do his supporters now trust Russia more other Americans? This president's words and actions provide haven to white supremacy groups who wave confederate flags and burn crosses. This is resetting our country and making it great again, really?

This is not normal. This is unacceptable. The electoral minority elected the drunk at the bar who wants to pick a fight with everybody. He has an opinion on everything and a plan for nothing. He uses no facts and no critical thinking. His skill is an antagonistic big mouth and one-line, baseless solutions, "build a wall," "rough them up," "my (nuclear) button works." It is time to be the bouncers and throw him and his spineless congressional supporters out. Unfortunately, like most bouncers, we'll have to pick up the mess the drunk leaves behind.

Bill Coggio

Troy Township

Busting the unions

TO THE EDITOR

I have to dispute Donna OKeefe's views of the passage of Act 10 in 2011 and the resulting public response. She repeats or suggests a well-worn canard about an alleged "violent backlash." I participated in several protests, locally and at the Capitol, and found them uniformly peaceful.

Gov. Walker, however, caught on tape in a "smoking gun" moment, discussed with a caller he thought was David Koch the possibility of planting provocateurs to incite violence and discredit the protests. The whole conversation can be heard at www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBnSv3a6Nh4.

The suggestion that the protests were driven by "outside sympathizers" is another piece of misinformation. The people around me at the Capitol were energized, concerned citizens—a nurse from Eau Claire, a teacher from Appleton, even a right-leaning cousin of mine from Milwaukee who came with an AARP group to his very first protest.

Exerting major influence on the Governor was billionaire backer Diane Hendricks, to whom Walker promised "right to work" legislation using "divide and conquer" strategies. That conversation was captured on videotape and can be viewed at www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEG7yGeUQUo.

Ms. OKeefe seems to think that Act 10 was passed to benefit taxpayers of Wisconsin. On April 14, 2011, at House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearings in Washington, Walker, when questioned by U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich over how much money ending collective bargaining rights actually saves the state of Wisconsin, admitted, "It doesn't save any."

Interestingly state senate leader Scott Fitzgerald had told Fox News on March 9, "If we win this battle ... President Obama is going to have a much ... more difficult time getting elected and winning the state of Wisconsin." There it is: Bust the unions and bust the Democratic party.

From the horse's mouth.

Thomas R. Smith

River Falls

Elect a justice who fairly applies laws to all

TO THE EDITOR

With the spring primary election coming up, I'd like to ask everyone to think about what qualities you expect to see in a Supreme Court justice.

Spring elections are non-partisan, so politics should not play a role in this ballot decision. We should be looking for a person with a wide-ranging background—both in relation to the law and as a citizen. The best candidate needs a strong focus on the Constitution, and is one who believes in a judiciary that fairly applies our laws to everyone.

Not all candidates in this race are like this. Do your research. We need an individual who owes no favors to politicians. Look for experience and proven leadership; someone who will bring the values of hard work and fairness to the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

Let's take the opportunity to elect a justice who reflects Wisconsin's best with your vote on Feb. 20.

Tammy Tollefson

Town of Clifton

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